Concern for displaying sensitive company information on screens is rising due to GDPR, high-tech visual hacking gadgets and costly data breaches.

In a new study sponsored by 3M, more than 1,000 business travellers in Germany, India, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States were asked about their attitudes toward data privacy and the actions they take to protect sensitive company information when they travel.

“The study reveals that 8 out of 10 business travellers consider visual hacking a threat,” said Jessica Walton, global business manager, 3M. “What’s more alarming is that business travellers recognize the risk but aren’t leveraging effective safeguards against it. As a result, unprotected screens can be the weak link in a company’s IT security efforts.”

Data breaches have become commonplace, but many workers say they are not prepared to prevent them from occurring. According to the 3M study, two out of three business travellers have noticed someone looking at their screen. Despite this threat, more than 30% of business travellers say their organization has not educated them on how to protect sensitive information displayed on their screen.

For more information about how to help prevent visual hacking, visit www.3Mscreens.com/visualhacking

At a Glance: The 2019 Global Visual Hacking Study, sponsored by 3M:

Visual hacking is a threat.

  • Visual hacking is seen as a threat to 8 out of 10 business travellers – and concern is growing.
  • Sensitive company information is at-risk for business travellers, over three-quarters of those surveyed admitted to displaying company information on their screens while on airplanes and trains.
  • Half of business travellers say that public transportation is considered the riskiest place to view sensitive information on-screen.

Business travellers are visually hacked.

  • Visual hacking is rampant and a two out of three of business travellers have noticed someone looking at their screen.
  • Business travellers risk revealing sensitive data on their screens. Over 1 in 3 business travellers have seen business information and/or personally identifiable information on exposed screens when traveling. 

Business travellers and their employers have a role in preventing visual hacking.

  • Business travellers try to prevent visual hacking, but most are not equipped to do so. Less than half of business travellers say they are equipped to stop a visual hacker, and 1 in 3 business travellers say their company has not educated them on how to protect sensitive information on their screen.
  • More than half of business travellers have changed how they protect their screens in the past year – most often driven by data breaches and high-tech visual hacking gadgets.

Visual hacking impacts business traveller productivity.

  • Very few people confront their visual hackers. Instead, more than half who noticed someone looking at their screen moved their screen or close their laptop.

Visual hacking may lead to costly data breaches.

  • 1 in 3 travellers link data breaches to visual hacking.

To view the full report, visit 3M’s website.

Source: 3M